Communication TwentyFourSeven

Maybe You Need to Reconsider Your Approach with Josh Porthouse

August 16, 2023 Jennifer Arvin Furlong Season 3 Episode 70
Maybe You Need to Reconsider Your Approach with Josh Porthouse
Communication TwentyFourSeven
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Communication TwentyFourSeven
Maybe You Need to Reconsider Your Approach with Josh Porthouse
Aug 16, 2023 Season 3 Episode 70
Jennifer Arvin Furlong

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Ever wondered what it takes to be an effective communicator and successful podcaster? Josh Porthouse, also known as Porter, joins us once again to share his unique insights into communication, values, and personal growth. Drawing from his rich experiences as an active duty Marine, Porter unravels how balance, open-mindedness, and a purposeful approach can significantly improve your communication skills and relationships.

From his journey in podcasting, Porter offers invaluable lessons on how to cope with challenges and leverage early mistakes as learning opportunities. He details how understanding the self-serving bias can heighten our communication capabilities and make us more artful in conflict resolution. This conversation will inspire you to reconsider your communication approach, whether you're a budding podcaster or an experienced communicator.

Click here to check out the Transacting Value Podcast.

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Ever wondered what it takes to be an effective communicator and successful podcaster? Josh Porthouse, also known as Porter, joins us once again to share his unique insights into communication, values, and personal growth. Drawing from his rich experiences as an active duty Marine, Porter unravels how balance, open-mindedness, and a purposeful approach can significantly improve your communication skills and relationships.

From his journey in podcasting, Porter offers invaluable lessons on how to cope with challenges and leverage early mistakes as learning opportunities. He details how understanding the self-serving bias can heighten our communication capabilities and make us more artful in conflict resolution. This conversation will inspire you to reconsider your communication approach, whether you're a budding podcaster or an experienced communicator.

Click here to check out the Transacting Value Podcast.

What It's Like To Be...
What's it like to be a Cattle Rancher? FBI Special Agent? Professional Santa? Find out!

Listen on: Apple Podcasts   Spotify

Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched!
Start for FREE

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.

Support the Show.

Click here and become an Insider and get a special shout-out on a future episode!

Please leave a review on Apple Podcasts.

Order your copy of "Cracking the Rich Code" today! Use code 'PODCAST' and get 20% off at checkout.

Join The Rich Code Club and take your business and life to the next level! Click here.

Are you a podcast host looking for a great guest or a guest looking for a great podcast? Join PodMatch! Click here.

Host a live stream, record an episode, deliver a webinar, and stream it all to multiple social media platforms! Try StreamYard today for free! Click here.

Record and edit your podcast episodes with the easiest-to-use drag-and-drop tools available! Try Alitu today! Click here.

Join Innovation Women today! Click here.

As an affiliate, I may earn a commission at no extra cost to you.

...
Speaker 1:

in hosting a podcast. I think there's different considerations that may be overlap, but there's different considerations to take into account when it comes to teamwork and, ultimately, effectively working together towards a common goal. We're communicating that intention in advance. Like I talked about values before, makes a big difference. I'll talk to my editor and say, hey, we've got X amount of conversations that we need to sort through and get edited before this day. What works best for you to pace it? If we do one every so often, two every so often, so you can balance work, you can balance your workload. What works for you? And then me being flexible, or learning to be flexible in that process, because it's not just what I want, force feeding, what I need to happen, I think, ultimately to get what transacting value, audiences or what they want in terms of quality and capability and consistency, then I have to be willing to be flexible and open-minded and work with other people.

Speaker 2:

How do we take our communication and podcasting skills to the next level? Josh was on the show toward the end of last year, where we talked about his experiences as an active duty Marine and the lessons he learned when he was deployed overseas exploring values, systems and human connection. If you haven't listened to it, go ahead and hit the pause button now and check it out. You will get so much out of it. I asked him to return this year to catch us up on how he's doing and how it's going with his show. The Transacting Value Podcast. We pick up our conversation pretty much where we left off. Last time, focused on the importance of values. This time we take it a little further and discuss how values can make or break your podcasting experience. You'll find a wealth of knowledge in this episode, even if you are not a podcaster, so listen up and apply that knowledge.

Speaker 2:

Welcome to the Communication 24-7 Podcast, where we communicate about how we communicate. I'm your host, jennifer Furlong. So, guess what? We have a return guest and I am super excited to have this conversation with Josh because it's been a while since I had him on the show. A lot of things have changed for him a lot of progression, a lot of challenges that he has been able to overcome with his podcast. He's just growing and just getting bigger and bigger. I'm really impressed with all of the work that he's doing, which is why I'm so excited to have him back on the show. I know it's going to be a really fantastic and interesting conversation. We are going to learn a lot, of course, focused on communication and how we can learn and grow and improve as communicators. So, josh, first of all or Porter, excuse me- how do you like to be referred to?

Speaker 2:

I know you like to go by Porter on the podcast, but when you're a guest, do you prefer Josh or do you prefer Porter?

Speaker 1:

Yes, when it comes to transacting value. Basically I try to portray a character. It gives me an opportunity to host with a little bit of intentional distance and communicate authentically and vulnerably, but on topics maybe that I'm just personally not ready to own and talk through, right, okay, yes, so here and now Josh is fine, but on the show I go by Porter.

Speaker 2:

Yes, Okay, all right. So no masks, no masks. This is all you, that's it. I am Iron man. Yes. Y'all, we're going to have Josh get a little vulnerable today. We're going to see how he fares with that. Here we go.

Speaker 1:

I might gloss a little bit, but let's see what happens.

Speaker 2:

So you're still active duty correct in the Marine Corps. So that's still the same, all right. And yeah, and still got the podcast going on. I know that that's growing and thriving. We're going to talk about that in a little bit. I know you're doing some writing, like you're really getting down in the creative space here. You're really doing things shaking and moving, so I really want to have a conversation about that as well. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

So the last time we talked was, I think it was August, but your episode in season two came out in September, yeah. So why don't we catch the audience up on just a quick, I'm going to say, make sure that y'all go back and listen to the first episode, by the way, episode 41, so you can get caught up. But just real quickly, let the audience know who you are. You know just a quick background bio so we can just make sure anybody who is new to listening to this they'll have a good understanding of who you are, sure, and Jen, first I got to say thanks for having me back.

Speaker 1:

I appreciate the opportunity, but, like 44, episode 44 for you back in September, right, yeah? And then what do you add now? 50 something, high 50 something, 60 something, yeah, 50 something.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, late 50s, sure, right Like holy crap.

Speaker 1:

Look at all the progress you've made. It's in what? Almost a year? Yeah, yeah, crazy, yeah, crazy. So I bring that up to say that all of this podcasting space and this industry is really, I think, benefited everybody. You know, it's like there's a guy that came on to Transact and Value and we talked. His name is Larry and he said a rising tide raises all ships, and I think that's totally true. In the podcasting industry right now, the notoriety, the professionalism, capabilities not to mention AI considerations and language learning, but just in general, people's ability to communicate through auditory learning or visual now right, like with videos on YouTube as well for podcasts has revolutionized the game.

Speaker 1:

You know, you think what 20 years in maybe give or take for podcasting and how far it's come You're like eight, nine, 10 months of growth is ridiculous what you've been able to do and your branding and your ability to obviously bring back now season three of your podcast right. So super cool what you've been able to do. I just want to make sure that I put it out there because, for everybody watching this, if this happens to be your first video watching with Jen or communication 24 seven, super cool, I appreciate it. However, you're missing some crazy stuff over the first two seasons too. So, man, super cool growth that you've got.

Speaker 2:

Oh, I appreciate that and you know it's not easy. It's hella work.

Speaker 1:

Seriously, you know it's pretty, but it's good. It's good hella work, you know, yeah, it's not hella work, it's hella work. I think that's what I'm going to call it now. But you know, all that being said, since August, september I guess, about a year ago I realized in trying for one, trying to start a podcast and two as a startup company, startup a media company, too many things to juggle and I didn't have the skill set, the intelligence.

Speaker 1:

I had plenty of ignorance, I guess, is about all I had and I don't think any of us are short of that.

Speaker 2:

So that's it, that's it.

Speaker 1:

That's it. It's all about the networking. I think I heard you say recently on your show and you know, having clarity or increasing amounts of it has made all the difference for me. So I found some super awesome people to work with now Contractors, freelancers right that, I mean man, the skill sets, the quality, the caliber. I'll tell you this the first thing that we talked about before I brought them in to work on anything was their value systems and I think, in front loading that and showcasing that that's something I'm more willing to focus on overtly with anybody I work with. I think it's really mitigated a lot of the issues we could have had and so it's been stupid smooth working with them. But because now I'm working with them, it's also given me more time to focus on clarity for the show and for this media company. That's right In messaging, in branding, in imagery, in actual communication skills and figuring out how to be more I guess you could say intentional with what I'm trying to say without seeming so boring and deliberate that I'm taking too long to process, right, yeah, man, I'm so excited man learning to prepare before talking to somebody, right, a little research goes a long way.

Speaker 1:

A lot of research doesn't go very far at all and that's sort of the balancing act, right. You go too far into it, especially with, like, your show being unscripted, mine's not scripted. It gets too rigid if you research too much and and finding balances like that Right as has made all the difference. So yeah, now man working on a nonfiction book series, I'm working on a fiction novel, obviously building out this media company and then transacting value, just building growth, the website and Working through what to do with it, in what direction to take it, plus clarity throughout the whole process and continuity in the, in the, in the mix. Yeah, I guess you could say has made for a pretty growth-filled year.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and in in between all of that, trying to find some time to put that uniform on and actually, yeah, yeah.

Speaker 1:

And to be fair, that's the one thing. I don't have to find time for other people. Find my time to do that for me.

Speaker 2:

So yeah, that's right you know I don't get a single is that.

Speaker 2:

The great work around. So let's let's focus in, because there has been so much that you have experienced over this past year in terms of growing as a podcaster, as a creator. Communication skills, of course, are gonna be at the heart of your ability to be able to to do all of that effectively, one of the things that I wanted you to talk about just real quickly for the audience. You know, as a part of that growth, a lot of people will look at podcasters and think, oh, it's just, it's you and you have your, your mic and you just kind of get on there and you say whatever you want and then that's it. That's all there is to it.

Speaker 2:

But really, I have been able to develop such a fantastic core of People who are just so incredibly helpful to me you know, and I may not necessarily Employ them or, you know, even have them on the show, but I'm beginning to to see how this really, even though this is my show, it's still somewhat kind of like a team effort, because I still have conversations with other podcasters and get insight from them and Learn from them, and you know so it really is you do have to be able to play well with others, I think. Still, if you're gonna be successful in this has that been your experience?

Speaker 1:

Oh, yeah, I Hands down. Hundred percent right. It's, and it's not even just Recording for the podcast, I mean, it's, it's all encompassing to be able to podcast effectively right Like at some point when we're recording you, you may hear the dogs in the hallway yeah right, yeah. Well, that that's how it goes right, but so then, ensuring that I've done what I can to prepare it events.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, but you got to go with the flow too.

Speaker 1:

Well, that's it right, but you try to keep the dogs downstairs right, and so I need help with that. When the doors close, you know what I mean. So things like that, all the way up to in Producing a podcast, in hosting a podcast, I think there's different considerations that may be overlap, but there's different considerations to take into account when it comes to teamwork and, ultimately, effectively working together towards a common goal, where communicating that Intention in advance, like I talked about values before, makes a big difference. Yeah, and so you know I'll talk to my editor and say, hey, we've got I don't know X amount of conversations that we need to sort through and get edited before this day.

Speaker 1:

So what works best for you to pace it? If we do one every so often to every so often, so you can balance work, you can balance your workload, what works for you? And then me being flexible, or learning to be flexible in that process, because it's not just what I want, force feeding, what I need to happen, I think, ultimately to get what Transacting value audiences or what I want, what they want In terms of quality and capability and consistency. Well, I have to be willing to be flexible and open-minded and work with other people. Yeah, a little creative license goes a long way, but I can't exhibit that without licensing other people to do the same.

Speaker 2:

I want to. I want to point something out real quick before you continue. This is a communication thing, is a communication skill, and I don't even know if you're aware that this is something that you have developed. That was a really good way to approach this person that you're working with. As far as editing you, you led with a clear Indication of what you would like to have happen. Right, there's X number of episodes we need to get through or there's X number of minutes that we need to make sure that we get out.

Speaker 2:

You know of a particular episode. You're very clear in what it is that you're expecting from them. You're hoping to get from them, while, at the same time, being thoughtful in asking them to come up with a solution on how to make that happen. I Don't know if you were like, did you go into that intentionally? Like knowing this is how I'm gonna approach this, so I don't come across, as you know, like this, this mean person who is just going to be dogging on this person to get this stuff done. Were you, were you intentional on that or did that? Is that just something that you feel like? Maybe I've just kind of learned that along the way. I've made some mistakes in my time, and that's this is a result of of learning from those mistakes.

Speaker 1:

Yes and no, I didn't intend to Be accommodating mm-hmm. No and I guess, ironically enough, I didn't intend to be that courteous because I was pretty one track-minded. Yeah, I figured.

Speaker 1:

Okay, I need to, you know, read the metrics and look at the analytics and make these changes and do what's popular and get this podcast going, whatever, especially within that first year.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I was just yeah, never mind that I guess. What did come out of that, though, is a lot of lessons learned based on my experience, and I think I think in large part because of that, I've I've just in the last year alone, grown devalue experiential learning Probably over anything else One. It fits my learning style a little bit better. I'd prefer to do things than any other means or method or mode, or whichever applies, but being able to have more time now that I'm working with other people as a team to produce this podcasting, you know, get it out to people that it's also given me an opportunity, like I said, to increase clarity. Right, and some of that is what experience do I bring to the table? What are my strengths that I bring to the table, and how am I willing to compliment other people, not have them compliment me, and I think that's been a pretty big driving factor for me, so a little bit of that was intentional. Yeah, yeah, but that's.

Speaker 2:

That's. That was well done. That was a really nice way To model how to have a conversation like that with someone that you're trying to have them complete some work you know for you, and to give them the space to be able to do that in a way that they're gonna be able to achieve it and not fail at it.

Speaker 1:

Can I ask you a question about that real quick? Yeah, so your your speech, teach like that's that's you, that's your thing, right? So from from TEDx to classrooms, to podcasts, like you talk about talking. Yeah so. So what have you seen? Is it more effective to make mistakes early and learn, or Go in with a plan that has proven, based on your experience, to be effective and Then maybe shift and change later what what's more appropriate and effective?

Speaker 2:

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Speaker 2:

There are days where I make all kinds of communication mistakes. You know I will piss you off because I'll say something that maybe I didn't intend it to go that way, you know. Or some, maybe I'm not listening as effectively as I should be. That's a big one. That's one that I actively try to work on every single day because I'm not naturally an Empathetic person, like people laugh at that. But no, seriously, I just I have to work hard at the empathy because I'm like, yeah, okay, yeah, life sucks, things happen, but you know, kind of like get over yourself, figure, you know Everybody responds to that, you know well. So I, I have to be mindful of that, depending on who I'm talking to you have to learn how to read people and then you know, be able to kind of adapt to that situation.

Speaker 1:

Well, okay, but I mean you've had to adapt, right like it.

Speaker 2:

Oh yeah, here's an example.

Speaker 1:

You're we're just talking about this before we, before we started this, right, but you're season three Trailer, the one you just put out. There's a lot of stuff you had to adapt to oh yeah, right, yeah, big time. Yeah, but. But ultimately, even based on some of your social media posts, a lot of that stuff has been, I mean, isolated to this one instance. But self-reliance and growth the whole way through. You know, over the last three or four decades has been you learning how to work through stuff.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, internally yeah like, maybe not on your own. You've had a team, so to speak, but a network, I guess, but but you still have to take the ownership and work through some of that stuff. Absolutely not not not to not to Ask you too many questions.

Speaker 2:

This is what makes our conversation so great.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I'm just, I'm just curious, right, like? Well, like you said, the communication expert to me means because you've been able to learn enough through your own experiences that other people may be willing or actually want to learn without having the same experience. Just to learn from you, right? So? Yeah your.

Speaker 1:

Your expertise is in your experience and your life. Yeah, your perspective right. So, yeah, have you maybe found that some of your Self-reliance bleeds over to your? I guess labeling of other people's capabilities and and putting that on other people, like Some of these communication errors you talked about, yeah, yeah, you should be able to understand what I'm saying, because I understand what I'm saying, right.

Speaker 2:

You know, it certainly can, it certainly can shade the way I View my interactions with others and that, can you know, it can be a good thing, but it can also be a challenging thing, because not everybody comes from similar circumstances and so and that's what the the entire platinum rule was all about right, you know, treating others the way they want to be treated, but that doesn't mean that you have to always acquiesce, that doesn't mean that you always have to accommodate. You know, you certainly can be honest in your communication, you can be truthful, you can be direct, while also Trying to be understanding of the other person. It's really difficult to do that because sometimes it's like, you know, I just want to tell you what you, what I think you need to hear, and guess what? It's gonna make you uncomfortable and that's okay, you're just gonna have to get comfortable with me being uncomfortable.

Speaker 2:

But if you're in any type of a relationship, whether it's a friendship or even in the office space, sometimes you're gonna have to have those difficult conversations that I think, if you're direct about it, you know, and you kind of talk your way through it like this is going to be a difficult conversation, it's going to be uncomfortable for both of us, but it's also something that I think we need to have to be able to get past this, and I want us to be able to get past this. I think you know that's Something that I've learned to do over time. When you have difficult conversations like that.

Speaker 2:

But, something else I wanted to point out, though real quickly, is that there's no magic Bullet, you know there's. There's no magic phrase or Communication tool or anything that will work in every single scenario, and that's the challenging part. I have had students that all as. So what should I do in this situation? Or what should I say? And I would always say well, it depends, you know, it depends on who it was the person, what's the situation, what time of day are we talking about? You know who's in the audience. So there is a lot that can go wrong and there's a lot that will go wrong. So you just have to be willing to say well, that sucked, that that hurt. I won't do that again. You know lesson learned, and then apply it, you know, or try to apply it, to the next, next scenario that comes up.

Speaker 1:

Oh yeah, well, that's sort of the point too. Right, identifying. Well, like you said, I think you need to hear something in a more direct format. Whatever the something is, I Think you need to hear it right. Okay, well, I don't think I need to hear it from you. Who's right? Right, like it's? It's like you said when you came on Transacting value I don't remember which, at which point, but one of the two. You said conflict is a natural part of life. Oh, yeah, right, and I Don't think that it matters. Now, in hindsight, I don't think that it matters. Identifying that it's natural. Necessarily, once you've become aware of it, it doesn't really go away. Right, like, you're like all right, conflict here, or necessarily. Who was right in saying my perspective vice, my perspective is more right? Yeah, but that the fact that, if both people are able to understand my perspective is different than yours. But here's what we have in common and where we can at least get to a yes, well then we'll just start from there because we don't have to agree on everything.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, A lot of that I think I've gotten just throughout my life experiencing life and people and deployments and whatever active duty isms come with that recruiter tag of travel, but also my divorce. A lot of it was just man conflict and communication or how we conversed. Yeah, that was it. There were good times. I was looking at the wrong. It wasn't like it was all miserable. I learned a lot. I enjoyed it. She's an awesome person. However, both of our communication skills really didn't compliment the other's way of interpreting them Right.

Speaker 1:

That's our both problems, right, yeah, and the conflict that we experienced became unnatural, right and. But it also became our baseline, yeah. So interpreting a lot of that and then I guess you could say, over the last 18 months or so now, working through and growing and building transacting value, that forms a lot of the underpinning where it's rooted in relationships.

Speaker 1:

But and I put this on Twitter here recently too but primarily two things Right. One, it's totally possible to get to know a stranger within a conversation that's values based, mm-hmm and totally on the assumption and understanding that you have nothing else in common. All right, that's the baseline. But secondly, it's possible to do that in 30 to 40 minutes. Mm-hmm.

Speaker 1:

And showcasing those two points exclusively now, and transacting value, I think, has to come with an awareness that we have all these things that are different between the two of us whoever's contributing on the show and myself that are different between the two of us, but that doesn't mean everything's different, and so the ownership that you brought up, I think, at least more specific to my experience, has to revolve more around choosing to heal or to view something differently, or choosing to identify commonalities, and also choosing to acknowledge the differences and choosing to talk through differences, choosing to actively listen, like you brought up vice, choosing to prove a point that's right, yeah, and a lot of those. They're not even communication secrets, they're just. I think the most important thing to do is to be aware of the differences and I think, on on awarenesses. Yeah, yeah.

Speaker 1:

If you don't, it's not there.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, there's self-serving bias that exists out there. You know, we have this amazing ability, the human animal. We have this amazing ability that when things happen to us, if something great happens, usually we'll want to take credit for it. Right, I got this promotion because I'm so awesome, right? Or I was able to buy this whatever because I saved up my money, you know, and I deserve this, yeah. Or I got this A because I worked so hard. I deserved this A. But then when something bad happens, we tend to what We'll want to we'll shove it into somebody else's responsibility, or oh, that person got the promotion because they're an ass-kisser right.

Speaker 2:

It's not because they worked really hard. You know I didn't get the promotion because they're an ass-kisser. Or you know I wasn't able to purchase this car because I didn't get that raise, because my boss is an ass, you know, whatever it is, and that's that self-serving bias, and I think that's the key. We have to be willing, like you said, with the choices that we make, we have to be willing to peel back those layers and call ourselves out on those kind of things. You had mentioned going through a divorce, and you know I mentioned this to you previously.

Speaker 2:

You know, being fresh for my own divorce, one of the things that I have learned recently is I don't want to be a bitter person, although I know I will have bitter moments, but I just I don't want to be bitter about it. Now, how I communicate in my behavior, you know that's going to be a direct reflection of where my head is at in the moment, and so I might slip up and I might say something snide, I might say something mean, but so that's something that, as a communicator, that's my responsibility to gauge that when is my mind at, how am I feeling in this moment and how is that going to impact my ability to communicate effectively. Well, that's it right.

Speaker 1:

Like you've got to choose to be an active participant in how you communicate with people. Yeah, and saying that, I think it's also important to note that you can totally have a shitty attitude. That doesn't make you a shitty person. Yeah, you can be bitter, you can be depressed, you can be happy and frustrated and angry. In that moment, yeah, yeah. Picking emotion, yeah, picking emotion that doesn't have to define who you are as a person, that's right. The awareness, though, has to come in too, and sort of compliment that, and it only takes one person or a group of people to see you acting on those particular emotions for them and their perception, to try to define you as a person.

Speaker 1:

That's right Right Now. You can change that? Well, not, maybe not. You can influence that, though. Right, like we talked about this before, and obviously when you were working with public affairs, that the perception is reality is the saying.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, but I don't think that it is though I think the perception dictates somebody else's reality, yeah, but that doesn't have to define who you are as a person. You know, there's one point that you brought up. I don't really want to keep relegating back to your trailer because you've got so many other cool conversations. Yeah, and since that season through trailer came out. But I have to because that's where the point was.

Speaker 1:

You said basically that you're choosing how to interpret how your divorce affects you and impacts you and what you say and what you do. Right Like it's. You need to move through that and it's important to talk through that and work through that. And now you're at a better place to be able to do that. That's right and I think a lot of that stuff Maybe unwittingly a little bit, and obviously I'm a little bit biased self-servingly to transacting value, but it has to come down to your value system, yeah.

Speaker 1:

You know, inadvertently or consciously, but either way has to come down to your value system. Because how highly do you rank consideration? How highly do you rank courtesy? How highly do you rank humility and ownership, or tact or tenacity or these other values? Right, that may. That may apply where I think and this may sound ironic your values don't have to define you, but they can totally refine you and it's it's sort of like building a sandcastle in a title zone. Right, like you know, it's going to get fucked up. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. It's going to. It's coming. It's a matter of timing and tides. Yeah Right, your sandcastle is going to get destroyed, but because maybe let's say, you value hard work and you're proud of what you accomplished and you want to be able to show it off and communicate whatever this design means to you in sand that you still take the time to put in details.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, you know there's a difference. I think when you think about I don't know six year old on the playground building something they're not really concerned with other people here may kick this over Right, still, the level of detail and attention, right. And I think, as adults, that sandcastle sort of metaphor is similar, except now we have awareness, or we could have awareness. Just because it gets knocked over Doesn't mean we learned nothing and it was a waste of time. Yeah, think about all the cool intricacies that you've learned to build into your style and your perspective and your ability to start, maintain, encourage, foster and relationships with people. That's a result of 27 years of practice, right, I mean, man, you do anything now for five years and you've been doing it forever. You know it's crazy. Jobs change so fast in this I guess you could call it still a gig economy.

Speaker 2:

Oh, absolutely, and you got to be able to adapt.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, 20,. Oh man, three decades of your life honing lessons on how to communicate with people. Right. Like you, almost didn't have a choice, in my opinion, but to perceive this experience from a lens any other lens then okay. Well, how can I use this to somebody? Else's. That's great, yeah, yeah. You know how do I use this to help people? Yeah, that was my go-to You're RNA right now, you know.

Speaker 2:

It's clear you love podcasts, or else you wouldn't be listening to this one and you may have even thought about starting your own podcast, but you just don't know where to begin. I would like to invite you to try Alitu. It's an online platform that uses very simple drag and drop tools designed specifically for podcasters. You can record and edit an entire show in no time. I know because I've done it. Don't worry about buying special equipment either. Alitu automatically cleans your audio so you sound crisp and clean. So if you were thinking about starting a podcast, stop thinking and start doing by clicking on the link in the show. Yeah, that was my go-to, like okay.

Speaker 2:

I got to look at this through the lens of what are some things that I can learn from this and then share it, because I'm not the only one who's going through this. He's going to go through this. Yeah, no way. He has gone through this.

Speaker 1:

No way. Yeah, and you said something earlier.

Speaker 2:

I wanted to touch on and kind of ask you as a follow-up question, you know, focusing on values, sure, and one of the things you've asked me before when I was on your show, like how have my values changed, or if my values have changed over time, you know, and you're right, the way we will perceive the importance, you know what level of importance, priority do we place on the values that we think are important to us? They absolutely have changed over time. You know, of course, when I was younger and in my early 20s, you know it was all about go after it and just get it, and it was all action and you know damn the consequences. Just don't even worry about it, just go for it, right, do it and then ask for forgiveness later. Right, that was how we operated. Just don't ask permission, just do it, and then you can ask for forgiveness later. That's why we learned so many lessons when we were younger, because that's how we operate.

Speaker 2:

But now I can definitely see, even just through this past year, with all of these changes that have occurred with me, I can definitely see my values shifting somewhat, with wanting to be more purposeful. I think humility plays a huge part in how I want to move through the world. You know that wasn't the case even just a few years ago, but it's very much in. You know, the front of how I want to operate through life now is humility and intention and just wanting to make sure that I can create something that is going to be a value for someone else. You know, that is something that's kind of feeding my soul. You know, right at the moment I wanted to ask that question of you. You know, since you've experienced so many changes from first beginning of your podcast and now, you know, as a creator, you're getting into writing and you're developing all of these ideas. How has that shifted for you, you know, over the past year or two since you've been, since you've gotten into this space?

Speaker 1:

Dude, exponentially. Yeah, Exponentially. I mean I don't know how to quantify how it shifted right Mm-hmm, Exponentially. So when I first put together, well, when I first started making videos for this brand, SurvivalDeadYT. I didn't know what I was doing. I sort of just hit the button, launched the torpedoes and full send. Yeah, Right Matter of fact.

Speaker 2:

What we do right.

Speaker 1:

I didn't know what else to do. I guess ignorance and inexperience and maybe, to a certain degree, maybe even just a willing omission of consequence. But I'll tell you the first video I put out I can't even remember what it was called now and it's on survivalyts, youtube. But I was in a car wash and one of the not the car wash, you're on the conveyor belt and you're moving through, but the one you put in corners and you do it yourself type of car wash.

Speaker 1:

It's a single bay sewer drain under your car. Well, so I put in quarters and I'm just talking to myself as I'm washing the car and I have been toying with the idea of making videos, putting them on YouTube. I got a buddy he goes by tech hustler, but he and I had talked a little bit and he said, dude, tell me your ideas, try YouTube out, feel it out, blah, blah. I told him, the idea is it bombed. And so I'm just trying to build myself up and think about it and think about it. And then I was there at the car wash and I said you know what man, 50 cents in the machine, record on my phone. Here we go, let's see where this goes.

Speaker 1:

It was horrible. The message maybe, but I was, it was forced, I was trying to be funny and I thought it was some sort of Koi like delivery and that, oh, this should be cool because it'll be relatable and it looks real, because it's me on my phone behind my steering wheel in the car and it's super cool and obviously everybody else doing these things, I'm going to get thousands of views. No, everything about it was horrible. The experience, whatever anxiety I had socially, even even just trying to come up with what I was going to say hastily after I hit record it was like 30 seconds of. I feel pretty good about this. I knew exactly what I'm going to say Record Fuck.

Speaker 1:

It left the building. Oh man, it was such a horrible experience. But looking back, I learned a lot from it. And it was, it was the first step, right, and you just got to just lean and put a foot forward and see where it goes, you know, and so it was pivotal for me. But at that point in time I said, okay, what are some of my values? What values can I attribute to survival Dan YT at the time, more specifically and I said, ah well, compassion and competence and loyalty, these types of things, maybe conviction I had in the beginning as well, right, and I said, oh, I'm going to see it through, but I didn't even, I couldn't define those words to you.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I didn't even know what I was going to do with them, right, matter of fact, we talked about them back. You know, august, I think you said it wasn't great. Cool, hey, you got values. Hey, now I'm talking about values, continuity, what are you doing, dude? No, right, and it was just forced and in it showed from the videos through, probably about the first right At the very least, what I considered season one of the podcast as well. Audio quality wasn't there. Well, how am I going to talk about competence when you can't hear me? Well, Right, this is now a podcast in my audio qualities trash or topics. I'll tell you this I didn't choose topics until after I recorded the conversations. There was zero prep work, yeah, yeah, and I was like, ah, I can't be that complicated, I'll talk about stuff I know. Right, stupid, complicated. That was a horrible idea, right, here's another one I didn't get. I couldn't get, or I couldn't figure out how to get people who were interested to come on the podcast, because I didn't even know what I was talking about. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I mean not specifically the topics, but the clarity. Even I didn't know how to convey any of it. All right, let's just talk about whatever. As long as you say values, I say values. We got values together. You know like what am I doing? And so nobody would come on the show.

Speaker 1:

So, season one, I was interviewing myself. I created these characters and personalities to interview. I gave them my problems, right, and then I talked to them about us, right, and I don't know. I still like the concept, but the way I executed it. Competence, yeah, how can you say you know what you're doing when it clearly sounds like you don't? In hindsight, what I've sort of grown on over the last year, and so, to sum all that up, I suppose, yeah, I learned that the values I initially ascribed to be part of this survival dead YT brand weren't as genuine to me. But, more importantly, I don't think I really knew what they were for me. And experiential learning I brought up earlier. I value that pretty highly now because I've started to realize the stuff I try to read in books. My reading comprehension is not that high, right, so I may read a paragraph seven or eight times and then realize I got zero.

Speaker 1:

I'll try tomorrow and then forget. I picked up the book Like it's not there. The you know, even auditory learning, my attention spans only so long. So then I zone out for what? Now I'm missing half the message. Okay, well, so I listened to your podcast. I take notes.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, but I'm doing it, I'm, I'm, I'm processing, and I'm not quoting what you say, I'm interpreting it and writing my notes Right, right. So it sort of gives me a rehearsal to experience, in a manner of speaking, what I'm hearing interpreted and be able to use it Right. And so experiential learning is something I didn't really consider before, cause I hadn't thought about it. Or creativity, right, I was almost hesitant to accept any sort of creative role because I didn't have any self confidence, my self esteem was trash. And we're talking just like in the last year. I'm 34, 35 years old now, yeah, three decades of life, and you're not confident, you don't know what you bring to the table. Yeah, that's true, I didn't know a clue. So I mean, I sure I guess I had clues, but I didn't pay attention to them, right, like, oh God, colonel Mustard in the library the whole time.

Speaker 2:

I had nothing.

Speaker 1:

So, finding ways to put that into these books I'm working on, or put that into this brand, jay, look, I made a hat.

Speaker 2:

Branding.

Speaker 1:

Right, yes, victory. I. I didn't know, I just didn't know. I didn't know what I didn't know. I didn't know what I didn't know. I didn't know how to do any of it or put any of it together, I just didn't know. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

And so owning some level of creativity right, wrong and different, effective or ineffective Just owning the fact that you know what, man, you did, come over something. Yeah, that's right. There are some things here that are resonating with people, and now my numbers are going up. Clarity is proving to be more effective, yeah, and I think if I had to pick three values that have changed, for me, experiential learning and creativity would probably be the top two, and I'd say probably the third is consideration, sort of like we talked about with my editor earlier. You know, just identifying that I may be a voice in the room, but I'm certainly not the only one. You know, it's like we don't. We don't go through life together. We grow through life together, but separately. That's right, and and I think it took me a while to grasp that more importantly, it took an active role for me to identify it, though, and not just jellyfish my way past it. You know yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, my values definitely have changed, and a lot of it was due to experience and the awareness of it. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

And the intentionality of, just like you mentioned, listening to something and writing down notes and interpreting what it is that you're listening to. That is a skill. I mean, listening is a skill. Look, even if you are trying to pay attention the research shows us you're paying attention right, you're actively listening You're still only getting half of what's coming at you 50%, five, zero. So, yeah, I mean, we are naturally terrible at listening and so it does take work. It takes effort, you know, to be able to get better at that skill, and by you being able to recognize. Let me get out a piece of paper. I am going to what I'm going to listen and then I'm going to translate what I'm hearing so that I can make sure not only can I make sure I'm understanding it, but by doing this I'm going to be more apt to remember it as well, I mean, that's a that right.

Speaker 2:

there is such a important skill to be more effective at communicating. If there's like one thing that I would suggest somebody work on today, that would be it on that part of the listening, just listening to understand and take notes and see if your interpretation, you know, is matching up with what the meaning of whatever it is that you're listening to.

Speaker 1:

That's. That's a great point. I mean, we're talking about obviously listening to podcasts, but you had a guy on recently, robbie Samuels. I don't remember what you called the conversation of the episode. I'm sorry and, robbie, sorry man, but you're messing with me. Great, and one of the points he brought up. I can't even remember when it was now, but either way, not important. One of the points he brought up was was the art of the schmooze or the?

Speaker 2:

art of schmooze.

Speaker 1:

That's right. That's right. I tried to search if anything like that existed, but I didn't know how to spell it, so I but. But I always sort of attributed that to like sweet talking, small talking, like an important conversation, impertinent conversation, I guess you could say but it's not no it's. It's not ridiculously relevant, Right? And I think one of the points he brought up was, for example, networking events. He said draft up a followup email before you go to the event.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. How brilliant, is that Right?

Speaker 1:

Well, yeah, on one hand, but on the other hand oh my God, what do I put in it? I don't know what I'm going to say, but so that this, this nonfiction series I'm working on right now, is called intention and thinking. It'll be probably four books, right? Yeah, the reason I'm working on at present is intentional communication. And so how do you plan generically enough, or let's say, plan generically enough to prepare well enough to talk to anybody specifically about anything? Yeah, how do you prepare well enough to give people what they want when you haven't met them yet?

Speaker 2:

Right.

Speaker 1:

And so drafting this followup email, for example, before you go to the event, what's exactly like he brought up? Think through types of people, characteristics, profiles, concepts that might occur, come up in conversation or actually be on the receiving end of your conversation and then just say thank you, or we'll be in touch or close it out generically, however you want, but it gives you an opportunity like in weightlifting, like in competition, sports, any other number of arenas to visualize what you want to happen, to meet your expectations, at the very least, to create your expectations. That's right, and then we're more likely to be successful. And I think I think a lot of that is underrated. Oh yeah.

Speaker 1:

And man, and he really did. He put it so well. It doesn't even have to be really that in depth. It does have to be that intentional though.

Speaker 2:

That's right. Yeah, it has to be realistic too to just go in there and say, hey, I'm going to make sure that I meet a hundred people and I'm going to exchange business cards with a hundred people. Yeah, and that's why. What is the whole point?

Speaker 2:

just, to say that you did it. You know that's really not. How is that going to propel you forward? What is the goal behind that? What is that meeting? What kind of need is that meeting? Or you know it just that doesn't make sense to go about it that way. So, of course, when you attend these events, that's why you're not going to get anything out of it, because it was just an unrealistic goal that you set and there was really no intention behind it. Anyway, like, truly, what's the purpose behind doing?

Speaker 1:

I mean, that's where it comes down to, in some part, smaller, large authenticity. I think, yeah Right. And, and you know, I talked to a guy back I think it was in January of this year Gary Wayne, on Transacting Value, and before we hit record, he asked me a question, and I'm paraphrasing, but he asked me a question. He said so when you say values, what do you mean? Not specifically, what are my values, that's not how I took it, anyways but when you say values, what do you mean? My answer was examples, right List, a couple words like these. I don't know what I said, but as an example humility, gratitude, appreciation, courage, and his response, and I quote Josh son, those are values. And I said, oh no, I've been doing this all wrong. What do you mean? What do you mean?

Speaker 1:

And he really we worked around it right and figured out a way to work it. And now he's. He's officially a contributor on the show, but, but I think what it did for me was understand that values help to ground the growth of your character. Right.

Speaker 1:

So if you think through a networking event, for example, a conversation, a board meeting and let's put corporate offices out of the way for a minute it's a family reunion. It's it's show and tell in first, second grade to your classmates. It's you in a you know college classroom or a TEDx stage, wherever. But the way people perceive you before you show up in large part is based on your reputation. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

The way that people perceive you after you leave in large part is based on your character. Yeah, and so if you find a way to more authentically represent what your values are and what you actually put some stock into, well, you know, the 80% of communicating that happens to be nonverbal will speak louder than what you say. Anyway, yeah, yeah, and people will see that and they'll respond however they respond. But at least, no matter what the conversation is and how the event goes, you'll be able to sleep better at night if nothing else, yeah, and really what you're talking about here.

Speaker 2:

There are two different meanings that come about. Whenever we have a conversation with someone. You know we're going to have the content level meaning and then we have the relational level meaning, like earlier you mentioned, having like chit chat, that superficial chit chat that on the surface we may think it's really not a big deal, right, it doesn't matter. But when you think about the content level meaning of that chit chat yeah, what's your favorite movie? Or you know who's your favorite star, or what's your favorite genre? Or Marvel versus DC you know, whatever it is the content, the information that you're exchanging. That's one level. But then the other level of it is the relational. I'm taking the time, we're taking the time to get to know one another. We're taking the time to engage in this conversation. You know where we're actually in this together, learning and exploring. The relational message is that I care enough about you, I want to get to know you, I'm spending my time with you and I'm asking these questions. That's what's developing. You know, that relational level of meaning. And so those tiny moments, while on the surface they may seem like they don't matter, but really at the end of the day and I think that's what you're talking about the difference between that content level meaning and the relational level meaning. You know every one of these moments and I think that ties into you know when we talk about values as well, being able to recognize that if you truly want to create a space where you can have meaningful conversations and develop a relationship with someone, you have to be mindful of the relational part of that message.

Speaker 2:

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Speaker 1:

Man see, this is why I keep paper here when you talk. This is it right here? This is live action, folks, Live action.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, but the thing is you are already employing that, though. I mean, you are already doing that in your conversations, that when you have these conversations about values, the only difference is because I come from a background in communication like I studied this stuff. I'm just able to pinpoint oh, that's what it is, and just put a label on it. But you are actively doing it, you are actually doing it and you are learning how to do it day to day.

Speaker 1:

But, jen, the labels aren't always bad. It's sort of like we've been talking about it. Labels on down to the Marie Kondo application of labels that's good too. I'm sure it's got its place, ironically enough. But awareness of what's happening around you and being able to qualify that with some sort of a label, in a language, in a wording, in a methodology that you can process whoever you are, for example oh man, see, you said it in your trailer again that I forget how you word it exactly, but we all have our own journey.

Speaker 1:

It was essentially working on this and I agree right, you have to In that my buddy David I think I brought him up before we started recording this but my buddy David, he's an author out of SoCal and he mentioned or I guess we mentioned in our conversation on the podcast that each character that you create in a story inadvertently, no matter how much you avoid, it, is going to have a little bit of the author, essentially, yeah, and each character maybe entirely different pieces in each character, right? I've talked to a couple of authors at this point David and Cindy and a few others and they've all said similarly same things Like I don't like these things, but that character does. However, that character responds a certain way to these prompts and, turns out, I do too. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and I think some of that, for example, also applies to like perception of certain words. Mm-hmm. Yeah, but when I like personally, when I say family, I think okay, well, the collective of people you're born into, right, that's my baseline. In hindsight and over time, and I'm sure for plenty other people, that definition and that qualification of family isn't applicable. Maybe they had a shitty home life. Yeah, and the lady named Debbie come on the show and we talked about foster families. The importance of working through that type of a relationship. Mm-hmm.

Speaker 1:

Well, okay, see but, if the qualification of family is who you're born into. Well, in a foster family isn't a term that exists, yeah, yeah. And so then, becoming more aware that family is also who we create not who creates us, mm-hmm, but who we create and who we're able to trust and build confidence in and around and with and share memories. With this sort of attribution of family, the label of family changes and grows, right, yeah.

Speaker 2:

And so You're making me think of Ben Diesel. Yeah, I knew he was going to come up with that.

Speaker 1:

I was trying to avoid it, but I guess it was going to be different. Yeah, so you know, not to get all all dom on this, but like, but as an example, right, like, sometimes labels are good, mm-hmm, yeah, sometimes they have merit and they have value. And I think it's just important to say right now because I feel like, you know, when we say social media, I'm not talking about Twitter and Facebook and whatever specific platform. I mean, like, whatever medium people are using, social Mm-hmm yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, If you say label now it's race related.

Speaker 2:

Right yeah.

Speaker 1:

And it pulls in this negative connotation when it doesn't have to Right. It's just how do I describe something that I think you will understand better, because I don't have the words to do it. So I'm going to call it this thing. Can we agree that this thing looks like this? Yes, okay. Well, now we have something in common. Yeah, I don't prefer to do that with values, because that's abstract. I don't know how do. Oh man, here's what abundance looks like to me.

Speaker 2:

Oh, that's totally perspective right there.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, you know what I'm saying. Yeah, here's what courtesy looks like to me, or compassion looks like to me, or adventure looks like to me, and you're like no, that's Tuesday, that's selfishness and that's inconsiderate. Yeah. Well, an outlet Right.

Speaker 2:

Well, my specificity does matter in the language that we use. It does, because if I ask you, hey, I'm in the market to get a car, I'm looking for a cheap car Well, your definition of cheap, your understanding of what is cheap, could be completely different from my understanding of what is cheap. I could go up to somebody and they'll be like, oh yeah, there's a car over here, I mean, it's only 40 grand. And I could be like what? Yeah, that ain't cheap, right? Yeah, I was talking about like three grand, right? Exactly, it's all about the perspective, yeah. Yeah, right, that's what specificity matters?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, the cool thing about that journey, though, is at least in my opinion and in my well professional experience like you, can't dismantle to any degree of effect an ideology. Right, maybe you can. Maybe somebody out there knows, leave some comments, whatever, let us know, but I don't think so. Right, you can influence it, you can impact it. You could obviously sway it one way or another, or somebody's ideology wouldn't have grown to that point to begin with. But you want to talk about hearts and minds, man, we had it wrong in 04. We had it wrong since then. In my opinion, we didn't know any better at the time. We had it wrong.

Speaker 1:

It's not necessarily candy bars and food and shelter and fresh water. Those things play a role, right, and those things help. But what are we really conveying? Our money fixes your problems, and so what happens when our money is not there? Well, the problems still are, exactly. Yeah, well, you know. So how do we, I don't know increase self-reliance? How do we show people that self-esteem has value? How do we convey to somebody that your values are valid? Yeah, I don't need to agree with them.

Speaker 1:

Right, I'm not saying that this is some like I don't know Miss America answer, and no offense to Miss America pageants, but like a lot of those answers are kind of lofty, you know, not really rooted in much usually. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and I'm not saying that talking about values is going to pay the electric bill. I'm not saying that an increased awareness on how highly you value loyalty is going to get your groceries Right. But understanding what you value gives you an opportunity to perceive the world a bit differently. And then you regim that glove and you're like, okay, maybe my reality is bearable. And then that's the first step. That's where you lean in and you just catch yourself with whichever foot hits first, right, that's right. Hashtag, left on kill foot, but like it just, it just goes there. You know what I mean. And and that's it. And then after that, well, now you've got momentum moving forward.

Speaker 1:

There's a lady I talked to named Stephanie. She runs a. Oh man, what am I? What am I trying to say? She's the host of a podcast, man, steph, I'm sorry. Empower PR, empowered Author podcast, anyways. So she said, everybody falls, but it's up to us to determine do you fall forwards or do you fall backwards? Right, and so if you can at least identify in my self-serving bias that your values are your values and that you can totally communicate them, cherish them and heal from them, well then you're usually always going to fall forward and from that point you can climb up, you can move forward, you can run, you can low crawl, you can do whatever you want in a forward, more positive direction, with somebody else or on your own. And I think a lot of that growth with other people always benefits you. Somehow, a lot of that growth in your own head by yourself always influences other people. It's contagious and it may not fix the world's problems. It's not going to create world peace, it's not a cure all for anything, but it helps.

Speaker 2:

But I think if more of us could learn to look within ourselves and first be able to identify what those values are, and then how do we go about communicating or expressing those values to those around us, right? How are we using those to help us connect with others? I think that's a huge step in the right direction. You're right, I mean, we're not going to solve the world's problems, but it could be just one relationship at a time, really, that's ultimately what it's about, and in understanding that, also understanding that communication will not solve every problem.

Speaker 1:

Oh man, jen said it and so Communication will not solve every problem.

Speaker 2:

Effective communication can help you learn to recognize the problem and then also recognize that in this one instance, this might be one of those things that it's not fixable. And what communication is helping me do is to not only learn to read it for what it is and then understand it. But now I know maybe now is the time for me to pivot. Maybe now is the time for me to stop doing what I'm doing now quick, hitting my head up against this brick wall and make some different choices. So I think it's important to also remember that aspect as well about communication.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, I'll tell you, one of the most frustrating things I had as a kid was trying to get through, and I've still never done this. Let me just put it out there publicly he's trying to get through 52 cards in one house. Yeah. Never, not one time, not one time. They'd always fall down. That's right. I convinced myself, and maybe to a certain degree, up until this conversation. I think I'm starting to lose hope. But I convinced myself, for a while.

Speaker 1:

I convinced myself for a while that there were aspects of this failed card house that were effective. It was the other elements that made them ineffective, so it was just poorly proportioned or whatever. But I always had the most success in realizing I can continue using the same cards. It's totally okay to use a different design in the process. That's right, and I think, regardless of what topics, we apply that to conversations and communication in your case, divorce in our case, is values, in my case, character development or anything in between, we're not broken. We're still the same cards. Yeah, but every good deck has two or three jokers. You know what I'm saying? You just figure out how to use them. Yeah, and that's okay. Yeah, yeah and that's okay. I think that awareness and learning to communicate it, even if you're only communicating to yourself, changes the world.

Speaker 2:

Oh yeah, absolutely. I think that's the most important person you need to communicate with is yourself. Be real. Be real about it. Yeah yeah, no bullshit. Don't try to bullshit yourself or anybody else.

Speaker 1:

It's not going to work right. Eventually it washes off. You know, it may take decades, it may take days. Maybe it's in hindsight, in your 85. Yeah, but eventually, eventually, you look back and you're like I fucked that up a little bit yeah. Yeah, yeah, sure did. Yeah, and that happens right. That's how it goes. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely, and I think a lot of that, or I'm hoping a lot of that you're going to go more into it you talked a little bit about before we got on here. You talked a little bit about your Untie, the Not miniseries. Yes. Yeah, I'm stoked man. It's all about conflict and communication and, like you know, like novella drama with all the enticing Right that's right. Stay tuned.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I think it's going to be cool, you know, because it's all of the juicy self revelations, yeah, but in real time. You know, like you're processing now and that those aren't topics that get publicized as often, right, and man, especially in long form video like this, think about what goes on to TikTok or what goes on to Instagram or Facebook Reels, right, yeah, it's generally speaking, not saying it's only, but generally speaking stuff that's not going to help you work through those.

Speaker 2:

No no.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, probably not. Some things, I'm sure. Yeah, not a lot of it, right? So you know, finding opportunities to put that information out and then be willing to accept a little bit of vulnerability. I think Dan Coyle called it a vulnerability loop. You know, you put a little bit out there in the world, eventually people catch on and it promulgates itself and I think it pays dividends. Yeah, hands down. So whenever you decide to get that mini series out, I'm looking forward to it.

Speaker 2:

Well, thank you for the preview. Preview, yeah. Absolutely yeah. Well, josh, we could talk all damn day. I know you and I could go. We could have conversations that we'll just never, ever end. I cannot believe I mean it's been over an hour already that we've been having this conversation. Before we start wrapping it up, is there anything that we said we were going to talk about that we didn't get to yet, because we talked about this before we hit record?

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

What did we?

Speaker 1:

forget. That's a great point. I know I think I think we covered everything. I'm looking at like 20 different post-it notes, but I think we got everything we said we wanted to. Yeah, man, yeah, comprehending, or learning to comprehend yourself and communicate it effectively, that sort of self-literacy, I think goes far in empowering yourself, empowering other people, your overall character development, values-based, intentional type living and its application. I mean, that's everything we know is the short answer yeah, we talked about all of it. Oh, yeah, yeah.

Speaker 2:

This has been a great conversation. I have enjoyed it and, I hope, the listeners. There were some golden nuggets in there, y'all. So I hope that you took the time, listened all the way through, talking about long-form communication right yeah, I mean going for an over an hour. This ain't TikTok, this isn't just a five-second thing. There are a lot of meaningful messages that I think you have to be willing to take the time to have these conversations in order to get to those meaningful conversations. And I just appreciate you taking the time, not only just coming back on the show, but being a little vulnerable yourself, being willing to answer the questions and share your ups and downs, the challenges, the lessons learned, because at the end of the day, that's what communication is all about.

Speaker 2:

None of us are perfect. It's all a journey and Lord knows we are definitely. I mean, sometimes we're on the road, sometimes we get off the road. We're on a path, sometimes it's gravel, sometimes there's no path and we're just kind of bumping along and hitting trees and all kinds of shit getting in the way. That's just how it goes. I appreciate you sharing that with the audience and just helping us learn and grow with you. It's fantastic.

Speaker 1:

It goes both ways. Like I said earlier, you don't have to go it alone, but you can grow alone together. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Love it, love it All right. So tell us how to contact you.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, man. So for everybody listening, I've got a website now TransactingValuePodcastcom. You can stop by there, check it out. You can find on Twitter, facebook, instagram or YouTube search Transacting Value Podcast or SurvivalDadYT. In either case, it'll come up on any of those platforms and obviously on the website. All the social links are there as well Emails, survivaldadytcom. That's an easy way to communicate and you know what? If you prefer not to type I just figured this out recently you can drop a voicemail also on the website and record a quick review audibly or a message audibly on the website also.

Speaker 2:

Is that right?

Speaker 1:

Super cool.

Speaker 2:

I had no idea that was something. I'm going to have to look at that myself. Yeah, super cool. How awesome is that? Yeah, okay, hey, you know what I learned? Something new every damn day, every damn day, super cool. I'll make sure to put all of that in the show notes, all the links. So again, if you don't want to type everything out, just go into the show notes and click on the link and that'll make it easy as well, and then you can leave your voicemail.

Speaker 2:

Yeah for sure. All right, everybody. Well, that's it for today's show. Thanks for hanging out with us. I hope you got some good information out of this and we'll see you next time. Bye, thanks for listening. If you enjoyed this episode and you'd like to help support the podcast, please share it with others Most about it on social media or leave a rating and a review.

Improving Communication and Podcasting Skills
Effective Communication in Podcasting
(Cont.) Effective Communication in Podcasting
Choosing Effective Communication and Conflict Resolution
Perception, Values, and Personal Growth
Transformation of Values and Learning Experiences
Intentional Communication and Authenticity Power
The Power of Self-Reflection and Communication
Podcast Support and Show Notes